The Tao of a Macrame Rope Wall

ENDLESS ROPE CREATIVITY

From 13th-century weavers to modern day designers, the use of cotton rope in a macrame cord project has kept a steadfast hold on endless rope creativity, high quality art and inspiration. The use of cotton and cord in macrame has so much more to offer than a plant hanger, wall hangings, or something you window shop in the rope decor aisle at your local DIY store scouring for creative ideas. 

It's also the perfect time to squeeze in a little bit of meditation.

MACRAME NAMASTE BABY

The time and brain bytes used to row these knots side-by-side can be a complex process! The cool part: these interwoven patterns created for a macrame wall hanging may be time consuming, but it may also be a simple way to bring the chaos in your mind to a bare minimum. Just focus on the project at hand and it takes the mental clutter out of your mind and transforms it into a never-ending, always-changing state of mind to share with the world. 

In today's blog we are sharing someone else's "mental clutter" so you can see the mind-to-matter transformation we're talking about here!

PAUL DESIGNS PROJECT

We spoke to Architect and Interior designer, Paul Lewandowski, about Ravenox's cotton rope collection, and the rope that he used in his most recent macrame piece.

While most offices are adorned with plant hangers, Paul's office at Paul Designs Project now hangs 150 POUNDS of cordage that could weather the perfect storm and-it's pretty to look at. 

 

Ravenox Interior Architectural Design Macrame Wall Hanging

Image by Paul Lewandowski, Owner of Paul Designs Project,  via http://www.pauldesignsproject.com/

Paul enjoyed his Ravenox product so much that we decided to quote his review of the macrame cord:

"I have been knotting macrame for decades and am always looking for how to create three-dimensional form from rope and cord. This piece was conceived for my new studio (I am an Architect and Interior Designer) in the color that best suited Paul Designs Project's Logo. Since most macrame is highly structured and orderly, this piece was an exploration of growth that would suggest direction. It was also meant to embrace the texture that is possible with a larger size rope. Ravenox's 1/2" 3-ply cotton rope was wonderful to work with on this piece. It provided texture, depth of color and gave the knotting excellent definition."

 

Ravenox cotton, rope art, macrame, rustic, fluidity, movement

Image by Paul Lewandowski, Owner of Paul Designs Project,  via http://www.pauldesignsproject.com/

While speaking with Paul about his vibrant macrame hanging, one couldn't help but think about the intricacies of the cord and the way it encompasses fluidity and movement from start to finish. The fibers are twisted into yarn, yarn is twisted into strands, and three strands are then twisted into--voila!--3-ply braided rope. 

 

Here's a better glimpse of our high quality 100% cotton in the making: 

 

FLUIDITY AND MOVEMENT

The spirited and animated macrame artwork that Paul showcases in his Architectural Design office is "purposefully free form." He chose to try something less structured than what he typically creates.

Ravenox cotton, rope art, wall decor, interior design

Image by Paul Lewandowski, Owner of Paul Designs Project,  via http://www.pauldesignsproject.com/

Paul shares with us that, "The big open circle was the last piece, it allowed me to combine all of the rope coming from each of the tendrils it hangs from." As you can see here, the dynamic energy in this pattern still manifests a way to balance itself out.

The fluidity and movement in this macrame wall hanging is a simple reminder that something as ubiquitous as rope can transform into a rare, sensual embrace of chaotic and stunning beauty.

Ravenox twisted cotton, cordage, macrame, diy, hanging art

Image by Paul Lewandowski, Owner of Paul Designs Project,  via http://www.pauldesignsproject.com/

Paul may be an inspiring and well-seasoned artist with this sort of thing, but for those that aren't, let us dip our toes in the sand with some tips and pointers on how to start a macrame project with this detailed macrame blog. This will guide you on your own creative journey with simple instructions on how to create your own macrame plant hanger, macrame cord pillow, or macrame rope art plus a few other creative ideas.

If you are a beginner (or just a curious reader with a piqued interest) you may have some questions and that's okay-we are here to answer them!

WHICH ROPE FOR MACRAME USE

Well, that depends on your artistic angle, you little macrame angels.

Natural cotton is the most suggested material to use when creating macrame projects. Our natural white cotton is sourced from the rich soils of North Carolina, and Ravenox's high-quality cotton is ultra soft and durable, making the materials easy to work with on projects while knotting cotton cord. If you choose a non-dyed, natural white, you can also dye the cotton yourself and pump up your DIY project one more level.

Plus-the cotton absorbs color well and maintains its vibrancy for the long-haul.

Many artisans in search of macrame cordage also find that a single-strand cotton is also a popular choice. It all depends on what you are going for as far as size, detail, and what works best for your little meditation station.

Either way, the possibilities are endless. 

ECO-FRIENDLY ART WORK

The pre-colored yarn that we transform into Ravenox rope actually comes from pre-production teeshirts, turning textile waste into valuable new yarns for many life-cycles. Ravenox has partnered with Recover™ to provide the most sustainable colored yarns the industry can provide.

Ravenox Twisted Cotton Rope for Abstract Macrame Interior Design

Image by Paul Lewandowski, Owner of Paul Designs Project,  via http://www.pauldesignsproject.com/

Paul's wall-adorned piece is a prime example of that color vibrancy. Without getting too in-depth on the matter, we do want to mention a few ways in which his artwork actually incorporates this.

    • Recover™ yarn that is used in Ravenox Cotton Rope is Dye-Free. No dyes are used to match colors with Recover cotton fibers. No water is used and no chemical products are used.
    • Using textile waste as a raw material resource, diverting it from landfill and incineration. They become less dependent on virgin materials and save water, energy, CO2 emissions and toxic chemicals. 

    Whether you're just beginning at home, or you're a well-seasoned artist like Paul, we are here to help guide you on your artistic journey through the dynamic interplay of macrame rope and its endless flow of creations. 

     

    "Those who follow the natural order flow in the current of the Tao."

    Cordage & Rope Cotton Rope Macrame

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